Hilary Mantel, lady of the historical novel and only writer to win the Booker Prize twice, dies

British writer Hilary Mary Thompson, known as Hilary Mantel, has died at the age of 70 after a literary career in which highlighted his famous trilogy on Thomas Cromwell, chief minister of Henry VIII, for which he won numerous British literary awards. By “Wolf Hall” (“In the court of the wolf”, 2009) was awarded the Booker Prize and the second installment, “Bring Up the Bodies” (“A queen on the dais”, 2012), earned her that award again, making her the first woman to receive the award twice.

Born on July 6, 1952 in Glossop, central England, in 1973 she received a law degree from the University of Sheffield and later worked briefly in a geriatric hospital, an experience that she reflected in her novels. In 1972 she married the geologist Gerald McEwen, with whom she moved to Botswana in 1977, where she lived for five years to later move to Saudi Arabia, where she lived for four years and where she set some of her works. Back in the UK in the mid-1980s, she worked as a film critic for “The Spectator” magazine, as well as writing literary reviews and essays for “The Guardian” and “London Review of Books.”

Hilary Mantel, lady of the historical novel and only writer to win the Booker Prize twice, dies