Riget Exodus. The review of the Lars Von Trier series

25 years have passed but the hospital of the Kingdom also in the third season treats its patients / spectators with robust doses of satanism, comic nonsense and trans-nationalistic hatred. Out of Competition

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CINEMA SCHOOL OF WILD TRAILS: REGISTRATION OPEN YEAR 2022-23


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After viewing the DVD of the two series of The kingdom, by Lars Von Trier dismissing it in a tranchant way with a “But how can you make a boiata like that?”, the sleepwalker Karen (Bodil Jørgensen) goes to the homonymous hospital in Copenhagen pushed by a strange supernatural call. The elderly woman, to cure her sleep disorder, even manages to be hospitalized in the mythological Neo-Surgery ward, soon acquiring a central role in the increasingly apocalyptic events of the hospital built on the ruins of an ancient wash house.

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15 SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIPS WILD TRAILS

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It’s been 25 years since the end of the second season, a significant period of time for cinema and a real era for TV, but Riget Exodous, presented Out of Competition in Venice 79, seems to have skipped a predictable socio / political resemantization like a boring Youtube pre-roll. Faced with a product born since 1994 as an outlet for Von Trier’s narrative obsessions (elsewhere scorned) – the pastiche of commercial genres, the brilliant comedy, the cinema of the absurd – the third season of the events centered on The kingdom keeps intact the technical characteristics that make it the perfect product for the most fandom of binge-watching. Even the first scenes, which seem to accept the livid photograph typical of hospital serials of the last twenty years, are like a pat on the eye of the viewer (and it is no coincidence that the first episode opens with the image of a retina on which they slide quickly the already mythopoetic images of the first two seasons) which, in the space of a few minutes, will be able to decipher the false alarm and return, reassured by the escaped modernist danger, to the grainy yellow of the nineties.

Unlike the David Lynch who on the last season of Twin Peaks seemed to break down his authorial ax on a product revered beyond its merits, Lars Von Trier deals Riget Exodus like a toy to be redesigned just in the most discolored points, perhaps adorned with some new ribbon but keeping intact the original playful configuration. Thus, for example, there are no more cloying love affairs: the only possible sentimental bond will prove, at the end of the fifth episode, the umpteenth mockery of an always lazy Death. In the same way, the transnational rivalry between the soft Denmark and the efficient Sweden will acquire even greater weight becoming the engine of the story, between continuous verbal clashes that can be empathized by anyone who suffers the North-South dichotomy and furious demonological struggles in which he will be involved, in addition to the always Luciferian Willem Dafoe, Satan himself or Lars Von Trier, in a successful cameo that risks sounding mockingly like the end of a career. The devil, of course, is always he who, even here, continues to provoke fearlessly fishing in the murky Nazi historicism, that is, the Operation Barbarossa carried out somewhat abruptly by the Swedish Company group. Like the gesture of the horns that closed the opening of the first two seasons, perhaps even for the latter the exorcising function of these apotropaic insubordination will be underestimated.

The evaluation of the Sentieri Selvaggi film

The vote of the readers


5
(1 vote)

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ALL THE 79TH VENICE CINEMA EXHIBITION IN THE CORRESPONDENCES OF ENTITIES OF WILD TRAILS

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Riget Exodus. The review of the Lars Von Trier series