Watcher, the review: a thriller about paranoia | Nerd League

If you’re paranoid by nature this movie isn’t particularly suitable, let’s get started the Watcher review with this warning. As panic grows across the city for a possible serial killer on the looseJulia, a young actress who has just moved to town with her husband, notices a mysterious stranger watching her across the street.

Maika Monroe is truly authentic in expressing anxiety and paranoia in these kinds of stories and being persecuted (whether it’s something supernatural in one of the greatest horror movies of the 2010s, It Followsor also as in Greta), then she serves as an anchor for the director’s directorial debut Chloe Okuno (who appears to have reworked a script by Zack Ford).

Watcher is a mesmerizing thriller, discreet, slow-burning, with long looks and cramped lifts and a firm grip on either end of the gradual suspense. Monroe carefully modulates his performance, composing it with an exquisite balance of paranoia and credibility, and Gorman, whose angular features and glowing eyes place him firmly in casting categories for types who can play Nazis and even play psychotic killers, is a counterbalance. perfectly threatening.

Watcher is a genre film at heart, but it’s not empty-headed either. For this reason, Okuno creates a great metaphor for the male gaze, but never makes the film feel like it a heavy sermon on the power of a morally corrupt patriarchal society. Julia’s character simply exists in an all too recognizable world where women simply limit themselves to limited emotions, yet their perspectives are valued and devalued.

All of this is acutely rendered by the vital context within the parameters of a conventional thriller, vital enough to forgive him for his variations in the It Was Just a Dream scenes. Here in the era of enlightened horror thrillers, we watch movies like this and expect to rank them by their “elevated” approach to social or political themes, or their wild twists.

Cleverly thought, direct and rhythmic, Watcher skillfully juggles both. And ingeniously, the twist here is that it’s not a breakthrough at all.

Okuno, making its film debut after a series of animated shorts (including one of the best segments of last year’s horror anthology V / H / S / 94), immediately establishes a sense of alert, cutting the inquiring eyes of the taxi driver en route from the airport. The titles revolve around a long shot of Julia and Francis christening the sofa in their spacious new living room, as the camera pans back and forth, revealing how clearly the rest of the world can see in their love nest. Dis followed the trailer posted on YouTube:

Cultivating fear

Watcher, the review: a cleverly directed paranoia thriller

The screenplay, written by Zack Ford And later rewritten by Okuno, proceeds at a crawl to convey the gradual growth of Julia’s fears. At first, he guesses them. Is anyone really watching her, or has the big international move just upset her? But then there is the news of a serial killer on the loose, a madman nicknamed The Spider that sweeps away the heads of women. Just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean they’re not looking for you.

It’s nice to see Monroe return to the world of terror nearly a decade after she established herself as a ‘bewitching queen of modern horrorprotagonist of the homages of the twins John Carpenter of It Follows And The Guest.

He has a dreamy restlessness that seems almost fatalistic, as if his characters are always summoning danger from the ether to fight their boredom. It’s the perfect aura for a thriller that is slow to refute the doubts of his heroine. Monroe connects us to Julia’s fluctuating concern, the way she initially struggles with the possibility of her mind playing tricks on her.

In contrast to current trends in the therapeutic genre, Okuno only provides her with a whisper of background. All we really learn is that Julia was an actress – a job, not surprisingly, that can leave someone exposed to discomfort.

The film sees Julia (Monroe) go to Bucharest with her husband Francis (Karl Glusman), a marketing businessman, to set up a luxury apartment. Immediately, viewers are immersed in Julia’s foreign perspective, without subtitles, unable to understand Romanian dialogue. Things get creepy even when photographing Benjamin Kirk Nielsen voyeuristically walks away as Julia and Francis make love for the first time in their new home.

The next day, Francis goes to work, leaving Julia alone to study the Romanian language and attempt basic actions like ordering coffee from a local shop. She also makes some friends, including bilingual Irina (Madalina Anea), while she meets other neighbors and residents.

Paranoia

Watcher, the review: a cleverly directed paranoia thriller

Do you know what paranoia means? from gr. παράνοια “madness”, comp. by παρα- «para-2»(To indicate disorder, abnormal condition) and a similar theme to νοῦς” mind “]. In psychiatry, psychosis characterized by the development of a chronic delusion (of grandeur, persecution, jealousy, etc.), lucid, systematized, with its own internal logic, which is not associated with hallucinations, and does not involve deterioration of psychic functions outside of delusional activity.

Julia also notices a silhouette looking at her from the adjacent apartment building. Rightly scared, especially in light of recent reports of a serial killer killing young women, she feels suffocated and like a potential target. She also feels validated by running into a strange man (creepily portrayed by Burn Gorman) too often to be considered a coincidence.

Even if he’s not the killer, there is something unquestionably wrong with this silent and seemingly empty man (and it’s hard not to think the film ends just when it’s getting intriguing to explore his motives). The scenes between Maika Monroe and Burn Gorman would be almost unbearably tense to watch based on their performances alone, but the camera’s proximity to Julia heightens that sense of claustrophobia and impending doom. Feel that anxiety attack right next to Julia.

Francis disagrees with the situation. He is willing to entertain Julia’s unpleasant feelings, but he doesn’t view her experiences as legitimate signs of danger. He becomes increasingly agitated and begins to take advantage of the language barrier to mock her in front of his co-workers. As a result, Irina is the loyal and supportive companion here, asking a controversial but reasonable question about stalking and whether or not it’s worth being claimed as fair.

Regardless of the answer, Irina believes Julia. And thanks to Irina’s work as an underground club dancer, attuned to being watched, she lends Julia a bit of courage to overcome this oppression and face these fears.

Watcher is definitely an engaging and superbly crafted film. The script wants to say something about consequences men who don’t listen to women or take their concerns seriously, with an ending that pounds that thing mercilessly.

Shadow of loneliness

paranòia (rare paranoia) sf [dal gr. παράνοια «follia», comp. di παρα- «para-2» (per indicare disordine, condizione anormale) e di un tema affine a νοῦς «mente»]. - 1. In psychiatry, psychosis characterized by the development of a chronic delusion (of grandeur, persecution, jealousy, etc.), lucid, systematized, with its own internal logic, which is not associated with hallucinations, and does not involve deterioration psychic functions outside the delusional activity.

We conclude Wacther’s review by saying that however, for such a pleasantly grounded and terrifying character study, Watcher’s closing moments fall back on his message (which hurts doubly by coming out of some unpleasant and disturbing symmetrical imagery that could be read more. ways), preferring a pleasant finish.

It doesn’t seem like it’s the right choice for this particular story, but Watcher is worth watching.

Watcher will be in theaters starting September 7.

70

Watcher

Review by Laura Della Corte

Julia is barely mentioned and this serves the genre. Julia was an actress and she gave up on coming to Romania with her husband. Do you resent this? Fear is not an emotion as much as it is an attack on the whole self. Monroe embodies this. Although there are numerous “clashes” in Watcher, the terror here comes mostly from the threat of what might happen. There is nothing scarier than that. The mind can imagine anything.

ME GUSTA

  • Cleverly thought out, direct and rhythmic, Watcher juggles.
  • It’s nice to see Monroe return to the world of terror nearly a decade after she established herself as a bewitching queen of modern horror.
  • Watcher is definitely an engaging and superbly crafted film.

FAIL

  • Watcher’s closing moments hinge on its message, it doesn’t seem like it’s the right choice for this particular story, but Watcher is worth watching.


Watcher, the review: a thriller about paranoia | Nerd League